Events

Save the Date – Queer Beyond Repair
Ninth Annual DC Queer Studies Symposium

Friday, April 22, 2016

Free and open to the public. Details about online registration are forthcoming!

The symposium will be a daylong series of conversations that includes a plenary session with Eric A. Stanley and Craig Willse and culminates with a keynote address by Kathryn Bond Stockton, Distinguished Professor of English and Associate Vice President for Equity and Diversity at the University of Utah. Her most recent books, Beautiful Bottom, Beautiful Shame: Where “Black” Meets “Queer” (2006) and The Queer Child, or Growing Sideways in the Twentieth Century (2009) were both finalists for the Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies. She is also the author of God between Their Lips: Desire between Women in Irigaray, Bronte, and Eliot (1994). In 2013, she was awarded the Rosenblatt Prize for Excellence, the highest honor granted by the University of Utah.

February

Last Day of Schedule Adjustment for Undergraduates

Tuesday, February 9, 2016
This is the deadline for students to add/drop classes for the spring semester.

Christina Sharpe, “How a Girl Becomes a Ship”

Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 4:30pm, Marie Mount Hall 1400
Part of Queer Beyond Repair, the 14th Annual Lecture Series in LGBT Studies

Christina Sharpe is Associate Professor of English, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Africana Studies at Tufts University. She is the author of two books: Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-Slavery Subjects (Duke University Press, 2010) and In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (Duke University Press, Fall 2016). She is currently working on two projects provisionally titled Thinking Juxtapositionally and Refusing Necrotopia.

Colloquium with Christina Sharpe

Thursday, February 25, 2016, 11am-1pm, Francis Scott Key Hall 2120
Part of Queer Beyond Repair, the 14th Annual Lecture Series in LGBT Studies

Can’t attend Professor Sharpe’s lecture on Wednesday February 24 at 4:30pm? Or, just want MORE! This event follows Professor Sharpe’s talk from the previous day and is an opportunity for students and faculty to gather in a more intimate and informal setting for more extended discussion of the issues raised in the lecture. We hope you’ll join us to continue the conversation–all are welcome!

March

Mel Michelle Lewis, “Black Queer Feminisms and the Pedagogical Project: Strategies for Teaching the Self and Negotiating the Academy”

Thursday, March 3, 2016, 5pm, Prince George’s Room, Adele H. Stamp Student Union
Part of the Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion Spring Speaker Series

Dr. Mel Michelle Lewis and is an assistant professor of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and affiliate in Africana Studies at Goucher College in Baltimore, MD. Her research focuses on the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality – specifically addressing Black queer feminist thought, identity and performance, and feminist critical pedagogies. Dr. Lewis serves as the National Women’s Studies Association Governing Council’s Membership, Educational Outreach, and Programs Chair. Her most recent publication, “Corporeal Presence: Engaging the Black Lesbian Pedagogical Body in Feminist Classrooms and College Communities,” is published in Contemporary Black Female Sexualities (Rutgers, 2015). Her forthcoming publication, “A Genuine Article: Intersectionality, Black Lesbian Gender Expression, and the Feminist Pedagogical Project,” will be published in the Journal of Lesbian Studies, Special Issue: Identities, Gender Performances & Pedagogical Practices of Black and Brown Lesbian Educators. Dr. Lewis is an alumna of the University of Maryland, College Park Women’s Studies PhD program.

Sponsored by The Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion, The Graduate School, the Department of Women’s Studies, and the Pepsi Enhancement Fund

Spring Break, Sunday, March 13 – Sunday, March 20, 2016

Lee Edelman, “Being/Divided: Queerness, Psychoanalysis, and Ontological Negation”

Thursday, March 31, 2016, 4:30pm, Francis Scott Key Hall 0106
Part of Queer Beyond Repair, the 14th Annual Lecture Series in LGBT Studies

Lee Edelman is the Fletcher Professor of English Literature at Tufts University. He is the author of No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive (2004), Homographesis: Essays in Gay Literary and Cultural Theory (1993), and Transmemberment of Song: Hart Crane’s Anatomies of Rhetoric and Desire (1987). He is also co-author, with Lauren Berlant, of Sex, or the Unbearable (2013). He is currently completing Bad Education: Why Queerness is No Good.

Colloquium with Lee Edelman

Friday, April 1, 2016, 11am-1pm, 2115 Tawes Hall
Part of Queer Beyond Repair, the 14th Annual Lecture Series in LGBT Studies

Can’t attend Professor Edelman’s lecture on Thursday March 31 at 4:30pm? Or, just want MORE! This event follows Professor Edelman’s talk from the previous day and is an opportunity for students and faculty to gather in a more intimate and informal setting for more extended discussion of the issues raised in the lecture. We hope you’ll join us to continue the conversation–all are welcome!

April

A Conversation with Laverne Cox
Sponsored by the Vo!ces of Social Change

Monday, April 11, 2016, 6-7:30pm, Grand Ballroom, Adele H. Stamp Student Union
Laverne Cox is an American actress, reality television star, television producer, and LGBT advocate, best known for her portrayal of Sophia Burset on the Netflix television series Orange Is the New Black, for which she became the first openly transgender person to be nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award in the acting category.

Queer Beyond Repair

Friday, April 22, 2016, Tawes Hall
Ninth Annual DC Queer Studies Symposium

The symposium will be a daylong series of conversations. Events will include paper sessions and a plenary. The day will culminate with a keynote address by Kathryn Bond Stockton, Distinguished Professor of English and Associate Vice President for Equity and Diversity at the University of Utah.

Eric A. Stanley, “Death Drop: Becoming the Universe at the End of the World”
Craig Willse, “Queer Life ‘After’ AIDS”
“Surplus Life and Queer Death,” PLENARY for the DC Queer Studies Symposium

Friday, April 22, 2016, Time 3:30pm, Tawes Hall
Eric A. Stanley is an assistant professor in the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Along with Chris Vargas, Eric directed the films Homotopia (2006) and Criminal Queers (2015). A coeditor of the anthology Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex (AK Press, 2011) which won the Prevention for a Safe Society award and was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award, Eric’s other writing can be found in the journals Social Text, American Quarterly, Women and Performance, and TSQ.

Craig Willse’s work focuses on neoliberalism, urbanism, biopolitics, and racial formations. He is the author of The Value of Homelessness: Managing Surplus Life in the United States (University of Minnesota Press, 2015). His earlier work on the management of racialized housing insecurity and the homeless services industry has been published in Economy and Society and Surveillance and Society. He is co-editor, with Patricia Clough, of Beyond Biopolitics: Essays on the Governance of Life and Death (Duke University Press, 2011). Willse also works in queer/LGBT studies in an on-going collaboration with legal scholar Dean Spade. Their joint writing has appeared in QED, Widener Law Review, Against Equality: Queer Critiques of Gay Marriage (ed. Ryan Conrad, 2010) and Left Turn. Their multi-media project Free State Epitaph has been produced and screened in New York, Berkeley, Seattle, and Kansas City, MO.

Kathryn Bond Stockton, “Impure Thoughts and All They Birth: What Does the Dildo of the Future Look Like?”

Friday, April 22, 2016, Time 5:30pm, Ulrich Recital Hall, Tawes Hall
KEYNOTE for the DC Queer Studies Symposium, “Queer Beyond Repair”

Kathryn Bond Stockton is Distinguished Professor of English and Associate Vice President for Equity and Diversity at the University of Utah, where she teaches queer theory, theories of race, the nineteenth-century novel, and twentieth-century literature and film. Her most recent books, Beautiful Bottom, Beautiful Shame: Where “Black” Meets “Queer” (2006) and The Queer Child, or Growing Sideways in the Twentieth Century (2009) were both finalists for the Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies. She is also the author of God between Their Lips: Desire between Women in Irigaray, Bronte, and Eliot (1994). In 2013, she was awarded the Rosenblatt Prize for Excellence, the highest honor granted by the University of Utah.

May

Last Day of Spring 2016 Classes

Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Final exams are scheduled from Thursday, May 12 through Wednesday, May 18. See more information about the schedule of final exams.

Lavender Graduation

Wednesday, May 18, 2016, time TBA, Colony Ballroom, Adele H. Stamp Student Union
Sponsored by the LGBT Equity Center

Lavender Graduation recognizes an important milestone in the lives of our LGBTQ and Allied graduates. Each LGBTQA graduate will receive a rainbow tassel and a certificate of distinction. This event also provides an opportunity for our community to come together and honor those among us who have worked to make College Park a better place for LGBTQ people.

Graduates at all levels (certificates, bachelors, masters, doctoral) are especially encouraged to attend and bring family, friends, and other significant individuals in their lives. This may include members of faculty or staff. Of course, all faculty and staff as well as alumni are invited. Lavender Graduation is only held in May. Thus, December graduates are invited to join us at either the closest Lavender Graduation prior to or following their December graduation.

Dressy casual attire is recommended. Academic regalia is optional.

RSVP are requested. More information is forthcoming.

Campus-wide Commencement Ceremony

Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 7pm, Xfinity Center
The procession of students begins promptly at 6:40 p.m. The campus-wide commencement ceremony represents the culmination of a student’s academic career at the University of Maryland. Unlike the individual college or school ceremonies, it is an opportunity for the president to congratulate the graduates as a group. Although graduates do not walk across the stage in the campus-wide ceremony, it is in this ceremony that the degrees are officially conferred. At the end of the ceremony, the graduates will turn their tassels from the right to the left, symbolizing the transition from student to alumnus. The university encourages graduates, their family and friends to attend this approximately 90-minute event marking the beginning of the two-day commencement celebration.

Departments of Women’s Studies and American Studies Commencement Ceremony

Thursdays, May 19, 2016, 12 p.m., Memorial Chapel
In this more intimate commencement ceremony, the Departments of Women’s Studies and American Studies will recognize each graduate individually as their names are called and they walk across the stage. Students receiving bachelor degrees in Women’s Studies, as well as those receiving any one of the department’s four undergraduate certificates or minors, the graduate certificate, and master’s degree are invited to walk in the departmental ceremony. Graduates may bring as many guests as they wish; no tickets are necessary.

If you or your guests require special assistance regarding parking, seating, interpreters, etc., please send an email to Ms. Cliffornia Pryor (choward3@umd.edu).

Immediately following the ceremony there will be a Reception in 2101 Woods Hall — all Women’s Studies Graduates and their families/friends are invited to attend. No RSVP necessary. We hope you’ll stop by!