Past 2014-2015 Events

September 2014

Making the Most of LinkedIn (ARHU Career Series)

Wednesday, September 24, 2014, 3-5pm, 0223 Tawes Hall
RSVP via the University of Maryland ARHU Student Affairs Facebook page

During the first hour lab session you will learn how to maximize your LinkedIn account and make changes to your profile on the spot. Afterwards, get a professional picture/head shot with a photographer on site (services generously donated by NewDay USA).

Open Call Auditions for Agorafaux-pas: A Drag Cabaret

Wednesday, September 24, 2014, 5-7pm, 0135 Taliaferro Hall (Women’s Studies Multimedia Studio)
Jamie Coull, a visiting Australian drag artists and arts researcher who is a performance studies PhD candidate at Curtin Univeristy, is staging a drag cabaret. The show’s narrative draws creatively on personal stories of the playwright, as well as ethnographic data collected from San Francisco’s drag community.As her drag persona, “Agorafauxbia,” she is the 2014 2nd runner up title holder at San Francisco’s Faux Queen Pageant. Open to all people interested in performance and drag, including queens, kings, fauxs and everything in between and beyond! For additional information get in touch via email at jcoull@umd.edu or facebook.

NWSA Undergraduate Award

Deadline Friday, September 26, 2014, 4pm
Are you a UMD undergrad who has completed 12 credits of WMST courses? If so, you are eligible to apply to go to San Juan, Puerto Rico for this year’s National Women’s Studies Association Conference–travel, lodging, registration, and food expenses will be covered.

Triota is Accepting Applications

Deadline Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 11:59pm
If you are a student who has taken at least two Women’s Studies courses and earned a GPA of at least 3.0 in them, then you are invited to join the Beta Beta Chapter of Iota Iota Iota (Triota), the Women’s Studies Honor Society at UMD. See more information about Triota and apply online.

October

Critical Disability Studies: A Panel of Emerging Scholars at UMD

Wednesday, October 8, 2014, 3-5pm, 6137 McKeldin Library, ASL Interpreted
Sponsored by the Office of Diversity & Inclusion and the President’s Commission on Disability Issues

In honor of the semester-long Rise Above Ableism campaign and Disability Awareness Month, please join these four emerging Critical Disability Scholars at the University of Maryland as they discuss their work.  This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments served. Questions? Email Beth Douthirt-Cohen at bdc1@umd.edu.

Angel Miles, PhD Candidate, Women’s Studies

Izetta Autumn Mobley, PhD Student, American Studies

Mollie Greenberg, PhD Student, Sociology

Emma Sullivan, MEd Student, Special Education and Severe Disabilities

Department of Women’s Studies Fall Gathering

Friday, October 10, 2014, 2-4pm, 2101R Woods Hall, Women’s Studies Conference Room
Please RSVP to Cliffornia Pryor at choward3@umd.edu
Faculty, staff, students, and friends are warmly invited to the Department of Women’s Studies’ Fall Gathering. Join us for informal conversation, friendly socializing, and food as we welcome new and returning students, faculty, and affiliate faculty members to the Women’s Studies community at UMD.

Marisa Parham, “Without Innovation: African American Lifeworlds and the Internet of Things”

Tuesday, October 14, 2014, 12:30pm, MITH Conference Room, 0301 Hornbake Library
Part of Digital Dialogues, presented by Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH)
Marisa Parham directs the Five College Digital Humanities Initiative, and is also an associate professor of English at Amherst College. Her teaching and research focus on texts that problematize assumptions about time, space, and bodily materiality, particularly as such terms share a history of increasing complexity in texts produced by African Americans. Her current projects include books and articles on the posthuman, on Octavia Butler’s unpublished work, and on problems of hypertextuality and abstract equivalence in American literature, film, and music. She is the author of Haunting and Displacement in African-American Literature and Culture.

Lisa F. Jackson, “Journeys to Justice: From Victim to Survivor”

Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 4-6pm, Colony Ballroom, Stamp Student Union
Part of the Empowerment of Women and Peace Series, presented by the Baha’i Chair for World Peace, co-sponsored by the Department of Women’s Studies

Two time Emmy Award winning filmmaker Lisa F. Jackson has been making documentary films for over 35 years. Sex Crimes Unit, her most recent film, is a portrait of prosecutors in the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office as they work to bring justice to victims of sexual violence. She is currently finishing a documentary about the epidemic of sexual assault on college campuses and the burgeoning movement of survivor activists who have begun holding their schools accountable.

Triota is Accepting Applications

Extended Deadline Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 11:59pm
If you are a student who has taken at least two Women’s Studies courses and earned a GPA of at least 3.0 in them, then you are invited to join the Beta Beta Chapter of Iota Iota Iota (Triota), the Women’s Studies Honor Society at UMD. See more information about Triota and apply online.

Alexis Lothian, From Transformative Works to #transformDH: Digital Humanities as (Critical) Fandom

Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 12:30pm, 0301 Hornbake Library, MITH Conference Room
Part of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) Digital Dialogue Series
Participants in creative fan communities have theorized their own knowledge production as in conversation with, yet distinct from both media industrial and academic models; drawing from these approaches enables us to understand “digital humanities” as a phenomenon that need not be contained within the bounds of the academy. In this talk, Lothian argues that digital humanities is a fandom — and that there is much to learn from attending to its processes and practices through the lenses developed both by fan studies scholars and by fans themselves.

Michelle Singletary, The Color of Money

Wednesday, October 22, 2014, 4:30-6pm, Maryland Room, Marie Mount Hall
Sponsored by the Department of Women’s Studies, TD Ameritrade, and the Robert H. Smith School of Business
Michelle Singletary, author and award-winning nationally syndicated for The Washington Post, will be speaking on campus as part of the Gender, Finance, and Power Lecture. Singeltary’s personal finance column is carried in about 100 newspapers across the U.S. Her work focuses on money management and empowerment. She is the author of three books, including her most recent work, The 21 Day Financial Fast: Your Path to Financial Peace and Freedom. Singletary is a graduate of UMD with a degree in Radio, Television, and Film. This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

November

Genny Beemyn, Beyond the Binary: The Lives of Trans People Today

Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 4:00pm, Maryland Room, 0100 Marie Mount Hall
Sponsored by the Department of Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education, and the LGBT Equity Center
Genny has published and spoken extensively on the experiences and needs of trans people, particularly the lives of gender-nonconforming students. They have written or edited nine books/journal issues, including The Lives of Transgender People (with Sue Rankin; Columbia University Press, 2011) and special issues of the Journal of LGBT Youth on “Trans Youth” and “Supporting Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Children and Youth” and a special issue of the Journal of Homosexuality on “LGBTQ Campus Experiences.” Genny’s most recent works are A Queer Capital: A History of Gay Life in Washington, D.C. (Routledge, 2014) and the “Transgender History” chapter for Trans Bodies, Trans Selves (Oxford University Press, 2014). They are currently working on a book entitled Campus Queer: The Experiences and Needs of LGBTQ College Students (Johns Hopkins University Press). In addition to being the director of the Stonewall Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Genny is the Trans Policy Clearinghouse coordinator for Campus Pride (www.campuspride.org/tpc) and an editorial board member and trans article reviewer for the Journal of LGBT Youth, the Journal of Bisexuality, the Journal of Homosexuality, and the Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice. Genny has a Ph.D. in African American Studies and Master’s degrees in African American Studies, American Studies, and Higher Education Administration. This event is free and open to the public.

Apply for the Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies

Deadline Saturday, November 15, 2014
Graduate students enrolled in other graduate degree programs at the University of Maryland are eligible to apply for the graduate certificate in Women’s Studies. The Certificate requires a minimum of 18 credit hours which provides students with an integrative and interdisciplinary academic encounter with the contributions and challenges of feminist inquiry, as well as supports student’s particular research specialty. See more information about the Graduate Certificate and how to apply.

Tone of Silence

Saturday, November 22, 2014, 3:00pm, Cafritz Theatre, Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
Saturday, November 22, 2014, 7:30pm, Cafritz Theatre, Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
Sunday, November 23, 2014, 3:00pm, Cafritz Theatre, Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
Tickets are required and FREE. Reserve tickets online today!
Part of the School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Second Season

Tone of Silence is co-written and co-directed by Sisi Reid, a senior theatre major and Black Women’s Studies minor. It is a new play about the various spaces of voicelessness and oppression we exist in and the journey to find our voice and speak our truth. Through poetry, movement, and interweaving story lines, Tone of Silence explores the shifting spaces of privilege in our daily lives and how the intersection of race, origin, language, class, and gender influence how we are seen and treated. The play is centered on the experiences of an African American and El Salvadorian family, a single mother and her two children. Various people in life we often don’t see or hear are made visible in this theatrical experience. Follow Tone of Silence on facebook.

December

Apply for the Ph.D. in Women’s Studies

Please note that we have extended our deadline to December 8, 2014. Please do not hesitate to let us know if you are experiencing any problems as you attempt to upload your application materials. Contact Dr. Rowley, Graduate Director mrowley1@umd.edu or Ms. Cliffornia Royals Pryor choward3@umd.edu.

Our doctoral students have the opportunity to engage in innovative and dynamic scholarship on women, gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity. Our department is a site where the systematic study and development of interdisciplinary theories and methodologies is encouraged. Our students pursue their inquiries drawing on both historical and contemporary contexts, and we strongly encourage independent research and course work that engage questions of difference and power.

Our Ph.D. program offers five overlapping areas of emphasis:

  • Gender, Race, Racialization, and/or Diaspora Studies;
  • Women’s Movements, Global and Local;
  • Bodies, Genders, Sexualities;
  • Gendered Labor: Households and Communities;
  • Art, Culture, Technologies, and Social Change

See more information about application requirements, including frequently asked questions. Contact Ms. Cliffornia Royals Pryor (choward3@umd.edu) or Dr. Michelle V. Rowley (mrowley1@umd.edu) with any additional questions.

Agorafaux-pas! A Drag Cabaret

Friday, December 12, 2014, 7:30pm
Saturday, December 13, 2014, 7:30pm
Tickets are required and FREE. Reserve tickets online today!

In collaboration with the Department of Women’s Studies, and Curtin University, Western Australia
Agorafaux-pas playfully narrates the mostly true story of Agorafauxbia – a straight identified faux queen whose identity is altered as she becomes involved in queer culture. The narrative draws creatively on personal stories of the playwrite as well as ethnographic data collected from in-depth interviews with faux queens in San Francisco’s drag community. The overarching theme is an exploration of questions and concerns which emerge when women do female drag. The show raises and addresses broad themes about identity and performing gender which will appeal to those interested in feminist and queer issues and theory. Agorafaux-pas is a scripted work inspired by drag cabaret. It includes lipsyncing, parody songs and original music. Check out Agorafaux-pas! on Facebook, or visit Agorafaxubia.com

Last Day of Fall 2014 Classes

Friday, December 12, 2014
Final exams are scheduled from Monday, December 15 through Saturday, December 20. See more information about the schedule of final exams.

Winter Commencement 2014

Campus-wide Commencement Ceremony, Xfinity Center, Saturday, December 20, 2014, 7pm
Departments of Women’s Studies, English, and American Studies Commencement Ceremony, Dekelboum Concert Hall, Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, Sunday, December 21, 2014, 3:30pm
These events are not only a celebration of the graduating students’ accomplishments at the University of Maryland, but also an occasion to acknowledge our joint enthusiasm for their future endeavors. The university recognizes that commencement is a milestone in our graduates’ lives and, as such, we strive to ensure that everyone enjoys their experience.

Call for Papers – Queer Speculations

Deadline for submission of materials: January 16, 2015
Conference will be held Friday, April 17, 2015

We invite proposals for presentations at QUEER SPECULATIONS, the 8th Annual DC Queer Studies Symposium at the University of Maryland. The symposium will be a daylong series of conversations about the various speculative practices queer theory, politics, and life engage, and the kinds of queer speculations about queer bodies, objects, feelings, pasts, futures, utopias, dystopias, and transformations that are emerging. Events will include paper sessions featuring faculty and graduate students, a buffet lunch, and a plenary session featuring Ramzi Fawaz (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and Shanté Paradigm Smalls (St. John’s University), whose work is expanding the field of scholarship on queerness and race in speculative cultural production.

The day will culminate with a keynote address by Juana María Rodríguez, Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Rodriguez is author of Sexual Futures: Queer Gestures and Other Latina Longings (NYU Press, 2014) which speculates about the world-making practices of queer of color femme intimacies and embodiments. Her other publications include Queer Latinidad: Identity Practices, Discursive Spaces (NYU, 2003) and numerous articles related to her research in sexuality studies, queer activism in a transnational American context, critical race theory, technology and media arts, and Latina/o and Caribbean Studies.

January 2015

First Day of Spring 2015 Classes

Monday, January 26, 2015

February

Pedro A. Noguera,”Racial Inequality and American Education: Policies, Practicies and Politics”
Odis Johnson, Jr., “Why Did Convergence of the Achievement Gap Stop? Residency, Race, and Inequality”

Thursday, February 5, 2015, 2pm, 2203 Art-Sociology
Part of the Structural Racism and Root Causes of Prejudice Series, presented by the Baha’i Chair for World Peace

Event Flyer with names of presenters and titles of lectures

End of Schedule Adjustment

Friday, February 6, 2015
This is the deadline for students to add/drop classes for the spring semester.

Alice Goffman, “On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City”

Thursday, February 19, 2015, 12-1:30pm, Margaret Brent Room, Stamp Student Union
Part of the 2014-2015 Guest Lecture Series, “Life Course and Obstacles to the Opportunity Structure,” sponsored by the Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity (CRGE) in collaboration with Maryland Population Research Center (MPRC)

The event is open to the public but registration is required. Please RSVP.
An urban ethnographer who grew up in Philadelphia, Alice Goffman is the author of the book On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City. The book is the result of six years studying the effects of the War on Crime and Drugs in a disadvantaged neighborhood of her home city. She teaches in the Sociology Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Michael Kimmel,”Mars, Venus, or Planet Earth? Women & Men on Campus in a New Milennium”

Wednesday, February 25, 2015, 2pm, Colony Ballroom, Stamp Student Union
Part of the Spring 2015 Lecture Series, presented by the Baha’i Chair for World Peace

We’re often told that men and women are so different we might as well come from different planets. In this engaging and entertaining lecture, Michael Kimmel strips away those myths and suggests that women and men aren’t so different after all. Surveying the landscape of current controversies about gender, he shows how men and women are transforming our campus and our culture — and why gender equality is actually a good thing for men! Michael Kimmel is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Stony Brook University, NY.

March

Dr. Bettina Judd, Lecture and Poetry Reading

Monday, March 9, 2015, 5-6:30pm, 6137 McKeldin Library (Special Events Room)
In patient., a researcher, herself hospitalized, is visited by the ghosts of enslaved women who were the subjects of medical experimentation by the “father of gynecology.” Exploring their stories and others, she finds herself entangled in a long history of the medical subjection and display of Black women’s bodies. Bettina Judd is an artist, writer and teacher. She is currently Visiting Assistant Professor in Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies at The College of William and Mary. Her current research explores feelin’ and feminist politics in Black women’s music, visual art, and literature. She is a Cave Canem Fellow and a Pushcart Prize nominee. patient. won the Hudson Book Prize from Black Lawrence Press.

Bettina Judd Reading Event Flyer

Tavia Nyong’o, “Deep Time, Dark Time: Kara Walker’s Anarchaeology”

Thursday, March 12, 2015, 5pm, 0106 Francis Scott Key Hall
Part of Queer Speculations, the Spring 2015 LGBT 13th Annual Lecture Series in LGBT Studies

Tavia Nyong’o is Associate Professor of Performance Studies at New York University. He writes, researches and teaches critical black studies, queer studies, cultural theory, and cultural history. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. Nyong’o has published articles on punk, disco, viral media, the African diaspora, film, and performance art in venues such as Radical History Review, Criticism, TDR: The Journal of Performance Studies, Women & Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory, Women Studies Quarterly, The Nation, and n+1. He is the co-editor of Social Text.

Colloquium with Tavia Nyong’o

Friday, March 13, 2015, 12:30-2pm, 2110 Taliaferro Hall
Part of Queer Speculations, the 13th Annual Lecture Series in LGBT Studies

Can’t attend Professor Nyong’o’s lecture Thurs. March 12 at 5pm? Or, just want MORE! This event follow’s Professor Nyong’o’s talk from the previous day and is an opportunity for students and faculty to gather in a more intimate and informal setting for more extended discussion of the issues raised in the lecture. We hope you’ll join us to continue the conversation about queer speculations–all are welcome!

Farzaneh Milani,”Iranian Women Writers: A Moderating and Modernizing Force

Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 3pm, Atrium, Stamp Student Union
Part of the Spring 2015 Lecture Series, presented by the Baha’i Chair for World Peace

Farzaneh Milani is Raymond J. Nelson Professor and Chair of the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures and former Director of Studies in Women and Gender at the University of Virginia. She has published several books, most recently Words, not Swords: Iranian Women Writers and the Freedom of Movement (Syracuse University Press, 2011; co-winner of Latifeh Yarshater Award), and over one hundred articles, epilogues, forewords, and afterwords in both Persian and English. She has served as the guest editor for special issues of Nimeye-Digar, Persian Language Feminist Journal, IranNameh and Iranian Studies: Journal of the International Society for Iranian Studies. She has written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Ms. Magazine, Reader’s Digest, USA Today, and contributed to National Public Radio’s All Things Considered. She has presented 240 lectures nationally and internationally. A past president of the Association of Middle Eastern Women’s Studies in America and a Carnegie Fellow, Milani was the recipient of the All University Teaching Award in 1998 and nominated for Virginia Faculty of the Year in 1999

Jamie Fader

Thursday, March 26, 2015, 12-2pm
Part of the 2014-2015 Guest Lecture Series, “Life Course and Obstacles to the Opportunity Structure,” sponsored by the Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity (CRGE) in collaboration with Maryland Population Research Center (MPRC)

Jamie Fader, the author of Falling Back: Incarceration and Transitions to Adulthood Among Urban Youth, focuses on the intersections of crime, justice, and social (especially racial) inequalities. She teaches in the School of Criminal Justice at the University at Albany.

Panel Discussion, “Emancipating the Past: Unchain the Future”

Thursday, March 26, 2015, 3-6pm, 1207 Cole Student Activities Building, David C. Driskell Center
Participants in the discussion include Dr. Michele Wallace, Professor at the Graduate Center, CUNY; Ira Berlin, Distinguished University Professor of History, La Marr Jurelle Bruce, Assistant Professor in the Department of American Studies, and Paul Landau, Professor of History, all at the University of Maryland, College Park; and Schwanda Rountree, attorney, art collector, and art consultant. Panelists will explore Kara Walker’s imagery as a point of departure for discussing issues of slavery, race, sexuality, violence, and gender, among others.

April

Miranda Joseph, “Investing in the Cruel Entrepreneurial University”

Wednesday, April 1, 2015, 5pm, 1400 Marie Mount Hall
Part of Queer Speculations, the 13th Annual Lecture Series in LGBT Studies

Miranda Joseph is Director of Graduate Studies, and Professor of Gender & Women’s Studies at the University of Arizona. She uses the tools of cultural studies to explore the relationship between economic processes and social formations. Her recently published book, Debt to Society: Accounting for Life Under Capitalism (Minnesota, 2014), explores various modes of accounting (financial, juridical and managerial) as they are deployed to create, sustain and transform social relations. Joseph has also published a series of essays, drawing on her institutional leadership experiences, addressing the projects of Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies and Ethnic Studies in journals such as GLQ, Feminist Formations, and Social Politics. Her first book, Against the Romance of Community (Minnesota, 2002) describes the mutually constitutive relationship between community and capitalism.

Ramzi Fawaz, “Stepford Wives and Female Men: The Radical Differences of Female Replicants”

Shanté Paradigm Smalls, “Superheroes, Queerness, and Anti-Blackness: Storm, Django, and Michael Brown”

Friday, April 17, 2015, 3pm, Ulrich Recital Hall, Tawes Hall
PLENARY for the DC Queer Studies Symposium, “Queer Speculations”

Ramzi Fawaz is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His forthcoming book, The New Mutants: Superheroes and the Radical Imagination of American Comics (NYU Press: Fall 2015), received the 2013 Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies Fellowship award for best first book manuscript in LGBT Studies. His research has been published in American Literature,Callaloo, and Anthropological Quarterly, and his essay on the aesthetics of AIDS cultural production appears in GLQ‘s special issue On the Visceral (January 2015). His current project treats the aesthetic and cultural politics of women’s and gay liberation since the 1970s. Fawaz is also co-organizer, with Damon Young, of the Sexual Politics/Sexual Poetics Collective, a national working group of early-career queer studies scholars in the humanities.

Shanté Paradigm Smalls is Assistant Professor of English at St. John’s University. Her current research uses critical race theory, hip hop studies, and queer theory to consider how New York City hip hop music, visual art, and film offers “queer articulations” or race, gender, and sexuality. Smalls is co-editor of “All Hail the Queenz: A Queer Feminist Recalibration of Hip Hop Scholarship,” a special issue of Women & Performance with Jessica Pabon and has publications published or forthcoming with Oxford University Press,Lateral, Criticism, and American Behavior Scientist.

Juana María Rodríguez, “Feeling Queerly, Knowing Otherwise”

Friday, April 17, 2015, 5pm, Ulrich Recital Hall, Tawes Hall
KEYNOTE for the DC Queer Studies Symposium, “Queer Speculations”

Juana María Rodríguez is Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is also affiliated faculty with the Department of Theater, Dance and Performance Studies; the Berkeley Center for New Media; the Center for Race and Gender; and the Center for the Study of Sexual Cultures. She is one of the founding members of the Haas Institute’s Center for a Fair and Inclusive Society’s LGBTQ Citizen Cluster, and currently serves on the President’s Advisory Council on LGBT Students, Faculty & Staff for the University of California. Rodríguez is the author of two books, Queer Latinidad: Identity Practices, Discursive Spaces (NYU 2003) and Sexual Futures, Queer Gestures and Other Latina Longings (NYU 2014) and has published numerous articles related to her research interests in sexuality studies, queer activism in a transnational American context, critical race theory, technology and media arts, and Latin@ and Caribbean studies. She is currently working on a third book project that considers the quandaries of representing racially gendered violence, pleasure, and trauma in visual culture.

May

Lavender Graduation

Wednesday, May 20, 2015, 3-5pm, Memorial Chapel
Sponsored by the LGBT Equity Center

Lavender Graduation recognizes an important milestone in the lives of our LGBTQ and Allied graduates. Each LGBTQA graduate will receive a rainbow tassel and a certificate of distinction. This event also provides an opportunity for our community to come together and honor those among us who have worked to make College Park a better place for LGBTQ people.

Graduates at all levels (certificates, bachelors, masters, doctoral) are especially encouraged to attend and bring family, friends, and other significant individuals in their lives. This may include members of faculty or staff. Of course, all faculty and staff as well as alumni are invited. Lavender Graduation is only held in May. Thus, December graduates are invited to join us at either the closest Lavender Graduation prior to or following their December graduation.

Dressy casual attire is recommended. Academic regalia is optional.

Please RSVP by going to http://ter.ps/lavgrad2015.

Campus-wide Commencement Ceremony

Thursday, May 21, 2015, 10am, Xfinity Center
The procession of students begins promptly at 9:20 a.m. The campus-wide commencement ceremony represents the culmination of a student’s academic career at the University of Maryland. Unlike the individual college or school ceremonies, it is an opportunity for the president to congratulate the graduates as a group. Although graduates do not walk across the stage in the campus-wide ceremony, it is in this ceremony that the degrees are officially conferred. At the end of the ceremony, the graduates will turn their tassels from the right to the left, symbolizing the transition from student to alumnus. The university encourages graduates, their family and friends to attend this approximately 90-minute event marking the beginning of the two-day commencement celebration.

Departments of Women’s Studies and American Studies Commencement Ceremony

Friday, May 22, 2015, 9:30am, Memorial Chapel
This event is not only a celebration of the graduating students’ accomplishments at the University of Maryland, but also an occasion to acknowledge our joint enthusiasm for their future endeavors. The university recognizes that commencement is a milestone in our graduates’ lives and, as such, we strive to ensure that everyone enjoys their experience.

Emancipating the Past: Kara Walker’s Tale of Slavery and Power

On display until Friday, May 29, 2015, 1214 Cole Student Activities Building, David C. Driskell Center
Kara Walker is one of the most successful and widely known contemporary African American artists today, remarkable for her radical engagement with issues of race, gender, and sexuality, and for the media with which she pursues her studies. Her work pries apart and examines the injustices that African Americans have faced throughout the long and tumultuous history of the United States. She explores power relationships in American society through the vehicle of representations of slavery, race, sexuality, violence, and gender set in the antebellum South. The works, which are inventive and painful, but also satirical and humorous, were selected for the show to display the range of approaches Walker has taken in exploring the legacy of slavery for contemporary American identity. The exhibition features about 60 works; along with Walker’s signature black paper cutout silhouettes, an array of prints, a wall installation, and a video will also be showcased.