Summer Courses in WMST & LGBT

Please register for any Summer 1 courses you are interested in ASAP. If you have questions about any of our classes please contact womensstudies@umd.edu.

Session 1: June 1 – July 10, 2020

LGBT200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies MOVED TO SUMMER 2

Section WB11 CORE: SB, D GenEd: DSHS, DVUP Instructor: Dr. Iván Ramos
An interdisciplinary study of the historical and social contexts of personal, cultural and political aspects of LGBT life. Sources from a variety of fields, such as anthropology, history, psychology, sociology, and women’s studies, focusing on writings by and about LGBT people.

WMST250 Introduction to Women’s Studies: Women, Art and Culture

Section WB11 Core: HA, D GenEd: DSHU, DVUP Instructor: Clara Montague
An examination of women’s creative powers as expressed in selected examples of music, film, art, drama, poetry, fiction, and other literature. We will examine women’s creativity in relation to families, religion, education, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and within a cultural tradition shaped by women. This class explores women’s roles as producers, subjects, consumers, and critics of art in the past, present, and future. Drawing on music, literature, performance, crafts, visual, and multimedia genres, we will situate art in conversation with sociopolitical movements on behalf of social justice. We will focus on how women’s creativity intersects with other dimensions of identity, including race, class, sexuality, and ability, in our increasingly digital world.                                                                                                               

WMST298N Racialized Gender and Rebel Media

Section WB11 Meets June 1, 2020 – July 10, 2020 GenEd: DSSP Instructor: Tangere Hoagland
Rebel Media: media for and by women of color that work to resist discrimination, oppression, and controlling images about women of color.

How do different forms of media shape the stories which circulate about race, femininities, masculinities, ethnicities, sexualities, religiosity, power and difference? How have various media formats been used to disrupt dominant stories, to tell new stories, and to create differing understandings of citizenships?

As a Scholarship in Practice course, students will analyze existing media campaigns, have a chance to develop their own ideas and media campaign to address a current social justice issue. Over the course of the semester students will explore the work of activists, scholars, and artists who have produced media that is used as a platform for racial justice, feminist activism, and cultural transformation, with a focus on the expressions of women of color. Students will explore activist media such as blogs, posters, zines, pamphlets, wearable media, sound, film, and more.

WMST379L/ LASC 348A /HIST 328I Topics in Women’s Studies; Online & In the Streets: Women’s Struggles for Justice in Latin America

Section WB31 (accelerated June 1, 2020 – June 19, 2020) Instructors: Dr. Cara Snyder and Sabrina González
Women’s struggles for justice in Latin America are at a critical historical juncture. Feminists throughout the hemisphere are organizing en mass to demand change and justice, to denounce pervasive misogyny and gender violence, and to envision and realize another world. They are mobilizing in digital and physical spaces under the hashtags #NiUnaMenos and #AbortoLegalYa, to condemn femicide, to advocate access to legal abortions in public hospitals, and to introduce comprehensive sex education in public schools. Women are fighting together for the right to live without fear, the right to make decisions about their own bodies, and the right to exist in a more feminist and just world.

WMST400 Theories of Feminism

Section WB11 Prerequisite: one course in WMST or cross-listed with WMST Instructor: Dr. Sydney Lewis
A study of the multiplicity of feminist theories which have been developed to explain women’s position in the family, the workplace, and society. Major feminist writings are considered in the context of their historical moment and in the context of the intellectual traditions to which they relate.

WMST498M/ HIST360 Advanced Special Topics in Women’s Studies; Women and the Civil Rights Movement

Section WB31 (accelerated June 1, 2020 – June 19, 2020) Instructor: Dr. Elsa Barkley Brown
Twentieth-century U.S. civil rights movement from the vantage point of women, considering both women’s involvement in the legal campaigns and political protests and the impact of civil rights struggles on women’s condition, status, and identity.

 Session 2: July 13 – August 21, 2020

LGBT200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies ADDED TO SUMMER 2

Section WB21 CORE: SB, D GenEd: DSHS, DVUP Instructor: Dr. Iván Ramos
The scope and context of this course is derived from two major questions: who or what counts as LGBTQ? And how is LGBTQ thus understood as an academic field of study? In this class the notion of LGBTQ will be seen as an ever expansive category that we can then understand through various forms of study. In this summer class we will take a film each week to explore some of the central concerns in the development of the field of LGBTQ Studies By traversing this historical schema, we can understand how and why LGBTQ has become an important concept to define non-normative sexual cultures. However, our trajectory will expand how we understand this history, looking at how race, gender, nationality, and
other forms of difference intersect with LGBTQ. The main goal of the course will not be to determine what LGBTQ identities are, but rather, how different fields in the academy have come to understand different historical moments. We will be aided in our analysis by theoretical texts and readings ranging from a variety of activists and theorists working on defining and understanding the importance of queerness. Ultimately, our goal will be to gain our own tools from LGBTQ studies to understand the variety and multiplicity of LGBTQ lives and cultures.

LGBT 327/ ENGL 359F: LGBTQ+ Film and Video

Section WB41 (accelerated July 13, 2020 – July 31, 2020) Core: D GenEd: DSHU and DVUP Instructor: Dr. James Goodwin
Comparative analysis of forms, themes, and the politics of representation in film and video by and/or about LGBT people. This course begins from the premise that movies are designed to give us a variety of meaningful viewing experiences, sometimes pleasurable, sometimes not. The class teaches a range of analytical approaches for understanding how films create meanings and what those meanings may be. In this course, we will trace both the diversity and similarities between global and Western representations of what we call homosexuality, bisexuality, and transgender identities as represented in film and video.

WMST250 Introduction to Women’s Studies: Women, Art and Culture

Section WB21 Core: HA, D GenEd: DSHU, DVUP Instructor: Cheyenne Stevens
An examination of women’s creative powers as expressed in selected examples of music, film, art, drama, poetry, fiction, and other literature. We will examine women’s creativity in relation to families, religion, education, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and within a cultural tradition shaped by women.  This class explores women’s roles as producers, subjects, consumers, and critics of art in the past, present, and future. Drawing on music, literature, performance, crafts, visual, and multimedia genres, we will situate art in conversation with sociopolitical movements on behalf of social justice. We will focus on how women’s creativity intersects with other dimensions of identity, including race, class, sexuality, and ability, in our increasingly digital world.

WMST 265/AASP 298B Constructions of Manhood and Womanhood in the Black Community

Section WB21 CORE: HO, D GenEd: DSHS, DVUP Instructor: Dr. Michelle V. Rowley
This course investigates the ways that African Americans are represented and constructed in public and private spheres and explores the social constructions and representations of Black manhood and womanhood from various disciplinary perspectives. We will use art, poetry, statistical data, film, theory, concepts, and documentaries to examine the varied and multiple understandings and experiences of wearing a black identity within the U.S. and to a lesser extent the African Diaspora.

In our time together, we will center the experiences of cis and transgender black people. We will leave the course knowing more about the Black Arts Movement, right alongside the Blaxploitation Genre. We will read Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin In The Sun and best-selling author, Tressie McMillan Cottom’s THICK. Reproductive Justice, Rethinking Prisons, Labor/Class, these are just some of the issues we will discuss.

AASP498Z Special Topics in Black Culture; Black Women in Popular Culture: From the Blues to Beyoncé

Section WB 21 Instructor: Renina Jarmon
Students will develop a broad understand of African American women in popular culture through the study of a variety of cultural forms such as literary texts, films, documentaries, visual art and novels. Students will develop an understanding of the connections between African American women’s cultural forms and the historical contexts our of which these cultural traditions arose.

For more courses that fit into the requirements for the WMST, LGBT, and Black WMST programs from WMST and from other departments please review this list.